Tuesday, November 13, 2007

The Politics of Evangelicalism

David Kirkpatrick contributed an interesting article for the October 28th issue of The New York Times. The article is entitled “The Evangelical Crackup.” (The article can be accessed at http://www.nytimes.com/). Kirkpatrick explores the seeming decline of political unity and influence of American evangelicals. Many of you are old enough to remember the powerful political force evangelicals had become in the early eighties due particularly to the formation of the Moral Majority by Jerry Falwell.

The current presidential race has seen divisions and confounding alliances among evangelical leaders. Wayne Grudem, a leading evangelical theologian has endorsed Mormon and former (?) liberal Mitt Romney. James Dobson, true to his convictions is supporting Mike Hukabee. Perhaps most shocking, arch conservative Pat Robertson has publically endorsed Rudy Giuliani.

Of the current political influence of evangelicals, Kirkpatrick writes:
“Today the movement shows signs of coming apart beneath its leaders. It is not merely that none of the 2008 Republican front-runners come close to measuring up to President Bush in the eyes of the evangelical faithful, although it would be hard to find a cast of characters more ill fit for those shoes: a lapsed-Catholic big-city mayor; a Massachusetts Mormon; a church-skipping Hollywood character actor; and a political renegade known for crossing swords with the Rev. Pat Robertson and the Rev. Jerry Falwell.”

Of particular interest to “Wichitans” is the inclusion of an analysis of pastor ________. As anyone living in Wichita knows, __________ has been a fixture in local news primarily because of his involvement in political issues. Kirkpatrick ends his article with a quote from pastor ________ that is sadly illustrative of the attitude he has displayed in the pulpit and the public square: “Some might compare the religious right to a snake. We may be in our hole right now, but we can come out and bite you at any time.”

The problem revealed in that statement and with much of the political activism on the part of conservative evangelicals is that they wage war with the same weapons and attitudes of the left. In the first three quarters of the 20th century conservative Christians criticized the political activism of liberal Christians. Dismissed as “the social gospel” conservatives saw the left’s politicking as a sad accommodation to culture. It was seen as seeking cultural transformation with worldly weapons rather than the Gospel of Jesus Christ which the liberals had already jettisoned. Ironically, while seeking different ends, conservative Christians have become accustomed to employing the same means as liberals.

What bothers me about this brand of evangelicalism is not that it offends but that it offends for the wrong reasons. The Gospel of Jesus will be a stone of stumbling to both conservative and liberal alike. The problem is that the Gospel and politics have, in many cases, become intertwined and confused. For instance, when a pastor rants about politics for 30 minutes (instead of preaching Scripture) he is said to have “really preached the Gospel.” This example, which I have personally observed in this community, reveals the sad reality that many conservative evangelicals have equated conservative political positions with the Gospel of Jesus.

Perhaps now is the time for a bit of self-disclosure. I am a flag-waving patriot and self-described conservative. I am pro-life and support an amendment defining marriage as being between a man and a woman. I have taught my children about the significance of Veteran’s Day and Memorial Day. We value American history in our home. My wife and I vote and believe it is a privilege and responsibility to do so. I love America and look forward to taking my children on their first trip to Washington D.C. I believe displays of patriotism should be common in the public square. However, God shares His glory with no one. The gathered worship of God’s people is not to be divided between praise for God and nationalistic celebrations. The mixing of worship and patriotism can be a very dangerous thing as Israel has found during her long history.

Be cautious my fellow conservatives. Just as liberal Christians became an arm of the Democratic Party, conservative evangelicals have been, in too many cases, co-opted by the Republican Party. The church must never become an extension of any political party. Politics and the Gospel mix about as well as oil and water. The message that Jesus Christ died for sinners, rose victorious from the grave, and all must turn to Him in repentance and faith or perish is incompatible with success at the polls. How many evangelical politicians have stumbled in articulating the Gospel because they are well aware of the fact that it is a stumbling block?

The bravado and vitriol so common among certain evangelical leaders seems inconsistent for a people who follow a crucified Savior; a Lord who said His kingdom was not of this world. What is more, Jesus resolutely refused to involve himself in the politics of His day. There was much to condemn in the Roman system and yet Jesus resisted the political wrangling so common among many of His fellow Jews. He turned down all attempts to become politically influential. The power that many of His followers hungered for, He rejected. I cannot imagine Jesus saying, “My followers may be down but not out. You never know when they will come out like a snake and bite you!”

4 comments:

Noel said...

Any evangelical Christian who wants to mix politcs and the gospel should follow the example set by Richard Wurmbrand. This Romanian pastor was imprisoned and tortured by communists for 14 years, while his only son wandered homeless on the streets and his wive lay ill in prison. Here is what he said about the communists who destroyed his family and stole 14 years of his life: "It was in prison that we found the hope of salvation for the communists. It was there that we developed a sense of responsibility toward them. It was in being tortured by them that we learned to love them." He also made the following statement before the fall of communism: "If the communists are overthrown in our country it will be the most holy duty of every Christian to go into the streets and at the risk of his own life defend the communists from the righteous fury of the multitudes whom they have tyranized." Would we do this for Tiller? For the terrorists? For the boss at work who make our lives miserable? Would we consider this "our most holy duty?"

Todd Pruitt said...

Wurmbrand is a hero. I recommend his book "Tortured for Christ."

casebo said...

Wow. Great post Noel. Thank you.

casebo said...

Wow. Great post Noel. Thank you.