Thursday, May 6, 2010

"Theological Leverage"?! (Updated)



This seems to be another sad case of biographical embellishment from a well known evangelical "leader." Liberty University ought to be ashamed. I expect no such emotion, however, from Dr. Caner.

Scripture teaches that few of us should be teachers for we will face a stricter judgement. It is the church's responsibility (as well as that of Christian organizations such as Liberty University) to hold accountable those who are entrusted with the mantle of leadership. Should they be encouraged, supported and prayed for? Absolutely! But they must be rebuked when their sin damages the purity and witness of the body of Christ.

Update:
Justin Taylor has posted the latest on this sad story. I hope that Liberty University will take this issue seriously. Justin posts a series of questions that James White has raised which indicate just how many problems there are with Caner's multiple versions of his own story.

9 comments:

ryan said...

Wow...yeah, "theological leverage" seems to be putting gravy on top of this. Incredible.

80808waldod_brogden said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Kimberly said...

Todd,

You might want to remove the link (above) from your blog.

Todd Pruitt said...

Thanks Kimberly. These pop up from time to time. Drives me crazy.

Todd Pruitt said...

"Theological Leverage" may be the worst euphamism for 'lying' I have ever heard.

Elke said...

http://www.liberty.edu/news/index.cfm?PID=18495&MID=18644 - Liberty is launching its own investigation. Praying for truth to be found, no cover-up and most of all no bloodbath between brothers and sisters in Christ.

threegirldad said...

I have to wonder if Dr. Towns didn't perhaps mean "leeway" rather than leverage. It wouldn't make the situation any more excusable, but it would at least make sense of his comment.

Mike said...

I remember reading an article by a business consultant whose 1st rule of business was to sell something addictive. Now initially you may think of "negative addictions" such as drugs, alcohol, gambling. tobacco, etc. but there are many addictions that are considered more socially acceptable such as coffee, exercise, blogging, etc. My point here is that I think christians are addicted to redemption narratives and are easily sucker-punched into believing remarkable redemption stories that validate what we believe. I think this is what happens in these cases when a charismatic speaker fabricates an incredible redemption story...we want to believe it so badly...because we want to believe our own story just as much.

Let's never stop looking for the truth, asking the hard questions, and wrestling with the even harder answers.

Jase and Melissa said...

I have great respect for Liberty, and it is sad that Caner appears to have been deceptive.

But I think there is another point besides candor, and that is: why does Caner & to some extent we as Christians at large, focus so much awe on what we were doing before Christ (Islam, drugs, etc.) instead of what God kept us from or has done since we met Him.